Kilmoon

Kilmoon

Over the past few months I’ve been happily following and commenting on Lisa Alber’s blog and she has returned in kind. The excitement over the pending release of her first book has burst upon us and Kilmoon has been launched.

For a peek into Lisa’s delightful personality have a look at her guest post on the inestimable Janet Rudolph’s blog: Mystery Fanfare.

LISA ALBER:

Travels to Ireland, or, Bah, I Scoff at “Write What You Know”

There’s an old writing adage that states, “Write what you know.” I never took it seriously and thank goodness for that, because if I had, I wouldn’t be here to tell you about Kilmoon, my debut novel.

The story of Kilmoon’s birth began with what I call my drawer novel, a tale filled with druids and lost manuscripts. (Quite the tale, yes.) I chose to set Drawer Novel in Ireland for many reasons, chief of which was my odd and unlikely fascination with an ecological anomaly called The Burren.

I wrote Drawer Novel in a state of heady cluelessness. If I’d listened to the naysayers who insisted I write what I knew, I wouldn’t have written the novel in the first place, much less traipsed off to Ireland for after-the-fact research that led me to stumble on the inspirations for Kilmoon.

Having never been to Ireland, I chose a B&B near The Burren pretty much at random. And let me tell you, cosmic forces must have been on my side, because I chose a B&B that landed me right in the heart of a novel not yet born, not yet dreamed of, not yet fathomed.

I ended up in Lisdoonvarna village, County Clare. It’s not a quaint village, more like a pub stop on the way to the coast. However, I couldn’t help but notice a pub with an odd name, Matchmaker Pub. The pub owner told me all about the annual matchmaking festival.

Whoa, I thought, wouldn’t a happily-ever-after atmosphere be a cool backdrop for a darker story?

Just a thought, in and out and forgotten for many moons because I was preoccupied with Drawer Novel.

The B&B itself was located a few miles outside the village proper. Talk about atmospheric Ireland! The landscape was downright moody at times, the way the leaden clouds whisked by overhead, casting shadows over drystone walls that slithered over the hills in every direction.

That said, I was disappointed by my B&B choice—too isolated—until I discovered an old church down the lane from the B&B. Twilight had hit the Celtic crosses just right. I stopped to snap some photos and was amazed to discover that I was standing in a thousand-year-old early Christian churchyard with only a tiny fingerpost to mark it.

Don’t ask me why I fell in love with Kilmoon Church, but I did. It really is a tiny, falling-apart place, but it sits peacefully on its plot, crumbling in the sea winds, brooding over its gravestones.

In fact, the sense of Kilmoon as a thing that can brood never left me, and in the novel it turned into: Kilmoon Church stood in genteel isolation, open air to the night as if shrugging off its Christian ties and embracing a more benevolent lunar goddess. The church seemed to watch us, indulging us our frail humanity and our unseemly trespass. We strolled around the site, taking in the uneven stones and skinny windows, the crumbling gravestones and tall Celtic crosses.

When I eventually set Drawer Novel aside, I found a matchmaking festival (and by association, a matchmaker) and Kilmoon Church waiting for me. On one hand I had what’s on the surface—happily-ever-afters—and on the other, secrets long buried. I love a good juxtaposition!

So I wrote Kilmoon, a story about a Californian named Merrit who travels to Ireland to meet her long-lost father, a celebrated matchmaker with a dark past. And I planned another after-the-fact research trip. After all, what’s not to love about traveling to Ireland for novel research? That’s all the reason I need not to write what I know.

Please leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Rebecca Bradley

Murder Down To A Tea

unbolt me

the literary asylum

Invisible-No-More

Making the most of your mid life crisis

building a better me

taking risks and pushing outside my comfort zone

smitten kitchen

Fearless cooking from a tiny NYC kitchen.

Rabia Rambles

Ramblings About Beauty, Lifestyle & Everything In Between!

Eclipsed Words

Aspire to inspire others & the universe will take note

Crime Fiction Writer Sue Coletta

Inside the mind of a crime writer

Nightmare Mysteries

nightmare, mysteries, unsolved mysteries, solved mysteries, scariest mysteries, creepy mysteries, creepy, scary, bizzare, serial killer, murderer, mysteries of the world, best mysteries, haunted

Whatever

THIS MACHINE MOCKS FASCISTS

Diary of A Movie Maniac

A Personal Journey Through Cinema & Television

elementaryvwatson

Life in Newcastle and beyond...

A. B. Funkhauser, Author

Celebrating the publishing journey.

Books n All Book Promotions

Crime books, Book reviews, Blog tours and more

ezer

egalitarian lifestyle blog

Los Angeles Mystery

Casebook of an Asian American Detective

mobevision.wordpress.com

fun and entertainmaints😂😂🤗

%d bloggers like this: